A Woman's Remains From 1977 Are Identified, And Authorities Blame A Serial Killer

https://www.npr.org/2021/09/23/1040127250/clara-birdlong-samuel-little-escatawpa-1977-serial-killer

[Error: Irreparable invalid markup ('<img [...] pascagoula,>') in entry. Owner must fix manually. Raw contents below.]

<p class="ljsyndicationlink"><a href="https://www.npr.org/2021/09/23/1040127250/clara-birdlong-samuel-little-escatawpa-1977-serial-killer">https://www.npr.org/2021/09/23/1040127250/clara-birdlong-samuel-little-escatawpa-1977-serial-killer</a></p><img src='https://media.npr.org/assets/img/2021/09/23/ap21264835616278_wide-063a619121563a8f5890efc1213b7c4ee26d015d.jpg?s=600' alt='This undated composite based on unidentified skeletal remains and provided by the Jackson County Sheriff's Department in Pascagoula, Miss., shows what the woman may have looked like.'/><p>Investigators used DNA to identify the remains as those of Clara Birdlong. They think she was a victim of the now-deceased Samuel Little, the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history. </p><p>(Image credit: Jackson County Sheriff's Department/AP)</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=1040127250' />

PHOTOS: How Families Struggle To Feed Their Kids In The Pandemic

https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2021/09/23/1039712201/photos-how-families-struggle-to-feed-their-kids-in-the-pandemic

[Error: Irreparable invalid markup ('<img [...] hosna.'/>') in entry. Owner must fix manually. Raw contents below.]

<p class="ljsyndicationlink"><a href="https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2021/09/23/1039712201/photos-how-families-struggle-to-feed-their-kids-in-the-pandemic">https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2021/09/23/1039712201/photos-how-families-struggle-to-feed-their-kids-in-the-pandemic</a></p><img src='https://media.npr.org/assets/img/2021/09/22/20210712-npr-lowres-8797_wide-b9342367c45743fb7252643ed8112d1a5a4257cc.jpg?s=600' alt='Mohd Ali, right, of Selangor, Malaysia, lost his job due to the pandemic. The family's favorite foods — fried chicken, eggs, fruit and bread — are now typically out of reach. When they can afford chicken, they give most of it to their daughter, Hosna.'/><p>For millions, the pandemic has meant a loss of income even as food prices are rising. The challenge for parents and grandparents is how to feed the youngsters in the family — and themselves as well.</p><p>(Image credit: Annice Lyn for NPR)</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=1039712201' />